Load-bearing exercises and how it can help combat osteoporosis

By Roy Kim, Apr 28 2014

Every year, osteoporosis causes almost 9 million fractures. That means every 3 seconds, a bone is fractured due to osteoporosis. Osteoporosis tends to affect older women and 1 in 3 women over the age of 50 will suffer from osteoporotic fractures. For men that number is 1 in 5. Osteoporosis is a silent disease and this is all the more reason to be concerned about it.

Load-bearing exercises are the best for bone mass and density. Putting more weight and strain on weak bones may seem dangerous or counterintuitive but it is the exactly what you should be doing to help treat and prevent osteoporosis. Research has clearly shown that you will reduce your risk of osteoporosis if you are active. In addition, your chances of getting osteoporosis are lowered even further if you do load-bearing or weight-bearing activities more than three time a week. But before starting any new exercise program please check with your doctor and clear any exercise with them before beginning. I’m not a doctor and lawyers are not cheap.

To put it simply, the exercises you choose should have you standing on one or both legs or lifting weights. Walking would be an example because your feet and legs are holding your body up. Swimming and biking, although they are good exercises, are not considered weight-bearing because your body is being held up by water or the bike and there is no lifting of external weights.

Some of you just want a list to follow. Here you go:

Jogging

Running

Hiking

Jumping Jacks

Squats

Dead Lifts

A more general rule to follow would be pick things up, put them down, repeat.

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